More About Cats

Cats were rare in our land. Their ships docked and traded, sure, but they had short visits. I know a bit about them from my travels, and I can definitively say that the six-toes were a good and decent species, despite their many peculiarities. We got along fine, as you may have read here, but there were cultural differences.

We were a dirty species by their standards, and had an affinity for rosemary oil. We’d coat our structures with it inside and out. Cats were repulsed by the smell, but polite enough not to say anything. Although, an old cat by the name of Simon once told me that dogs coating buildings in rosemary oil was a hold over from a long ago feud between our two species. I think he was touched in the head. We had nothing against the felines.

Cat music was played with beautiful hand-crafted string instruments made of cat wood. They had a special word for this wood, Vespa, but in our language it was just cat wood. The music always had a staccato element that they’d dance to in unison. They would bow, prance, switch partners, and bow some more, tippy toeing about. It was fancy. You can listen to a sample if you’d like, Cat Music.

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3 thoughts on “More About Cats

    • Thanks Terry, the six-toed felines were decent. I don’t know much about their five-toed inland cousins other than they produced the spices, were fancier, if you can believe it, and had two queens that didn’t get along. They kept to themselves, never traveling beyond their own lands.

      I always appreciate your feedback, thanks Terry. /low bow -BB

  1. Pingback: Cat Quarters | Baxter Biscuits

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